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AG2018: Jowen Lim strikes through the pain barrier

21 August 2018
Lee Yaocheng

 

“Pain is only temporary, quitting lasts forever.”

It is a mantra that has helped some of the world’s most resilient athletes, and that was the mentality Team Singapore wushu exponent Jowen Lim carried with him throughout the 2018 Asian Games.

 

Team Singapore wushu exponent Joven LimTeam Singapore wushu exponent Jowen Lim suffered an ankle injury less than a week prior to the Games but he refused to throw in the towel. Photo: Sport Singapore 

 

He had suffered an ankle injury less than a week prior to the competition, but endured the pain and made fourth place in the men’s daoshu and gunshu event with a total score of 19.40, missing out on a medal by a mere 0.01.

“I was quite worried about whether I could compete at first. I sacrificed so much for this Asian Games so even before the doctor cleared me for this competition, I was determined to compete whatever the doctor said,” the 19-year-old said.

“I just thought about how hard I trained and how much I sacrificed. If I stop, all these would have gone to waste.”

The injury wasn’t minor either – he had to wear a foot brace and had trouble walking without a limp. One can only imagine the agony he must be going through during the jumps, twists and turns. But for the sake of the competition, he had to push all that pain aside with sheer willpower.

“If I carried an attitude that I was not confident during my routine, I wouldn’t have done well, so I kept away all the bad thoughts.”

 

Team Singapore wushu exponent Joven LimTeam Singapore wushu exponent Jowen Lim in action. Photo: Sport Singapore

 

The SEA Games gold medalist even had to go to the extent of changing his routine to accommodate his sprained ankle.

“Because of my injury, I’m not really happy with my performance because I didn’t get to showcase my full ability after training so long,” said Jowen.

“There were some jumps and twists that I was supposed to do, but I didn’t in the end. And also some footwork that involved spinning that I had to change.”

For an event judged based on its precision and aesthetics, it was a major disadvantage. But now that his Asian Games campaign is over, Jowen will now use this experience to push himself further for the Taolu World Cup in October.

“It gives me encouragement to work even harder because now I know how strong my competitors are. When I’m training, I’ll have to work harder to overcome them.”

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Tags: Major Games

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