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Forehand throws

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Image credit: Boon Ping Chua/SportSG

The Forehand Throw is the most efficient throw in Ultimate Frisbee because it uses the least amount of time and effort to execute. Good for short, medium, and long range, it is a difficult throw to master but here are some simple steps to execute it:

1)    To practice the motion required for the Forehand Throw, angle your arm in an L-like position and pretend you’re turning a doorknob directly above you. Notice that you are solely using your wrist to make this movement. Most of the spin and momentum of the disk comes from the wrist action. A strong wrist movement also means a stronger throw.

2)    Next, make an L-shape with your thumb and pointer/middle finger. Or you can spread both your pointer and middle fingers out while still keeping your thumb out. Now that your fingers are now correctly positioned, it is time to fire off some flicks.

3)    Use the same hand to hold on to the disc by putting the rim of the disc in the gap between your middle and ring fingers. The top side of your middle finger will rest on the inner rim and bend your thumb over the top of the disc. While the disc might not feel very stable in this position, as long as you keep your grip tight with your thumb, it will hold.

4)    It is time to execute the throw! Hold the disc parallel to the ground at your mid-torso and remember the doorknob motion in step 1. Now, do it while pulling your wrist as far back as you can and release the disc forward. If you did it right, the disc should fling off your fingers and travel about 3 to 6 meters away.

Now that you know the basics of doing a Forehand Throw, here are some tips to keep you improving and making your throw a more effective one.

1)    Don’t be shy to experiment
Everyone is different, whether it’s the length of our arm or the power we possess. Some of us are good with short-range throws, some are better with long-rage throws but you never know what you’re good at until you try. Or maybe it’s your throwing technique. Try adjusting your grip or the strength of your flick, and notice the different results.

2)    Practice
Lots and lots of it! Your wrist flick is definitely not going to be perfect at the first few throws, but after much trial and error you will learn how to control your accuracy and power variability. Training can also increase your muscle memory and lets you flick without thinking much. So be patient and work hard, and you will get the perfect throw one day.

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