Backhand throw


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One of the easiest and most common throws in Ultimate Frisbee is the Backhand Throw. Inspired by the backhand in tennis, this movement is led by the same side of the body. Backhand throws can be used for short, medium, and long-range passing. It might seem complicated at first, but practice these simple steps a few times and you should get the hang of it.

1. Get a Grip

Depending on which suits you better, either pinch grip the disc with the thumb of your dominant hand on top and the rest of your fingers on the bottom or put your index finger along the rim of the frisbee with three fingers on the bottom. Make sure your fingers are extended, not curled.

2. Stand Upright
Stand with your feet at shoulder width apart and keep your knees slightly bent.

3. Face the Target
Turn your body where your dominant hand is located towards your target by making sure your shoulder and elbow face that direction.

4. Curl Up
Curl your dominant hand and wrist till the disc lightly touches your forearm and bend your elbow until it touches your belly button. Keep your non-dominant arm back by your side.

5. Step Up

Take a step forward while turning your dominant foot towards the intended target.

6. Release
Start straightening your elbow. Next, snap your wrist. Point your index finger at the target. And THROW!

Once you have sufficient practice with the basic Backhand Throw, feel free to give some of these more advanced versions of the throw a shot.

High Release Backhand
Do the same throw but with an almost straight arm just above the shoulder at a 45-degree angle. Most of the disc’s and snapping motion propulsion will come solely from the wrist. This throw is especially effective for short-range passes.

Low Release Backhand
Following the same arm motion as a regular backhand, release the disc just a few inches above the ground. The lower you do it, the better. Be sure to give the disc a slight upward angle to keep it from hitting the ground. Sometimes the knee might get in the way, but that’s nothing a little bit of practice can’t solve. This throw is often for short and medium-range passes. It is also useful for stalling a defensive player, as one would have to take a big lunge outward and reach low to catch it.

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