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How to start running injury-free

18 January, 2016   Lee Yao Cheng

More than 300 running enthusiasts turned up for the ActiveSG Running Clinic held by three industry leading experts at the Auditorium in the Singapore Sports Hub on Friday.

Michol Dalcourt, an internationally recognized expert in human movement and performance, along with ultra-marathoners Stone Tsang and Scott Hawker gave participants advice and practical tips on how to train effectively and injury-free.

Dalcourt said it is important for people to keep bodies constantly fit and conditioned as running is a physically stressful activity for our bodies, and doing too much exercise too suddenly can easily lead to injuries.

running clinic Michol Dalcourt speaks during a presentation at the ActiveSG Running Clinic. Photo: Sport Singapore

“For example, if I am sitting down at my desk for the next five years and not doing much. My tissues will be affected by that sedentary lifestyle. The resiliency of my tissues will suffer and the support in my body will suffer,” he said.

“So when I take up running as an intervention for exercise. There's a lot of stress associated with running and although that stress can be accommodated by a fully functioning body, if my body has a tendency to be de-conditioned, that extra stress is going to lead to potential injury.”

“And there is no fun managing injury as opposed to managing fitness and performance. The biggest mistake that we make is we don't adequately prepare the tissues for demands of running or do too much volume too quickly.”

For new runners or runners who have not exercised for an extended period of time, it is also imperative they vary their exercises as that will lessen the likelihood of sustaining injuries.

running clinicMichol Dalcourt (right most) gives tips on avoiding injuries while running during the ActiveSG Running Clinic. Photo: Sport Singapore


“The biggest consideration is variability. We want to do various forms of physical activity. If we do too much of one thing too soon, that will lead to cumulative wear and tear and that wear and tear could lead to potential injury,” he said.

“The biggest advice that I might give is, if you are going to start or if you have started with an exercise regime, the key consideration is can I vary the stresses so that aspects of my body can be strong and remain strong.”

“If I am running, can I do some other things with it. If I am doing resistance training, can I do some other things with it. The wide variety is going to be helpful.”