The sweet truth about sugar

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Myth 1: Sugar is the cause of obesity

Weight gain is a result of an imbalance between energy intake and output. Hence, identifying sugar as the sole culprit of obesity is an oversimplification. Obesity is a complicated disease influenced by a lot of factors, and no single factor is sufficient to cause weight gain on its own, so keeping away from sugar will not lead to a slimmer body.

If you’re worried about your calorie count, you’re far better off taking note of your fat intake. The myth about sugar and obesity continues to mislead us into adopting sugar-free meals, which eventually hinders one from having a balanced diet.

Myth 2: Sugar causes hyperactivity
When you come across a very energetic child, you’ll likely chalk it up to a ‘sugar high’ or ‘sugar rush’, blaming it on the extra piece of candy they must have had after breakfast. However, you’ll be surprised to know that there’s hardly any scientific evidence backing that popular claim.

Most of the time, this myth boils down to a persistent belief from parents who insist on a link between sugar and their hyperactive child.

Myth 3: Sugar causes diabetes
The notion that there is a direct link between sugar and diabetes isn’t as straightforward as one might think. While it is true that diabetes is a disease involving too much glucose in the blood, a high blood sugar level will not always be resultant of consuming a lot of sugar.

In fact, eating sugar has nothing to do with Type 1 diabetes, caused mainly by genetics and several other factors that trigger the disease. Obesity has been identified as one risk factor for Type 2 diabetes, coupled with a diet high in fat and calories.

As such, diabetes is more often a result of genetics and other lifestyle factors, instead of simply the consumption of too many sweets.