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Food and drinks that increase your urge to eat

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Food and drinks that increase your urge to eat

over eatingPhoto: Shutterstock

Some have heard of efficient eating, which involves consuming only the right types of food in order to satiate hunger and taste cravings, as well as to fulfil nutritional needs. Doing so ensures you do not waste your daily calorie allowance on innutritious things that will not make you feel full.


In this piece, we go through four different types of food and drinks that bring about lowered levels of satiation and increase one’s propensity to over-eat.

Refined carbohydrates

Most would know that overloading on the carbohydrates – a food group typically high in calories – does pose potential disadvantages to those seeking to shed excess weight.

Carbohydrates, particularly the refined sort, are the top suspects on our list of food items that increase your urge to keep eating. The forms of sugar in refined carbohydrates are broken down easily, so consuming food like white bread and muffins will cause sugar content in the blood to increase very quickly, triggering the pancreas to produce more insulin, signalling cells to store the sugar.

This will then result in a rapid fall in blood sugar, indicating to the brain the body’s need to replenish this sugar with more food, stimulating sensations of hunger.

Alcohol

Think that a few rounds of post-dinner drinks would be a good way to round off your meal? Think again.

Researchers have agreed that alcohol brings about a decrease in leptin in your body, a hormone that provides you with feelings of satiation – there is a reason why it may seem quite a challenge to put down that dish of bar snacks.

Of course, under the influence of alcohol, people also generally become less inhibited, and are more likely to reach out for that extra piece of buffalo wing!

Fruit beverages

Sure, juices and smoothies may be packed with vitamins, minerals, and enzymes, but they are also high in sugar due to the fructose found in fruits.

Like refined carbohydrates, the sugar content in such drinks causes abrupt spikes and falls in blood sugar levels, causing cravings and hunger, making a juice blend a less-than-ideal meal replacement.

Besides, such drinks lack the fibre that actual fruits can provide, and liquid calories won’t keep you feeling full for as long a time as solid ones do!

Food high in salt

Some studies have shown that salt (sodium) triggers dopamine, a compound in the body that is associated with pleasure – that’s why it’s always so difficult to relinquish that bag of potato crisps once you pick it up!

Salt also causes the body to dehydrate, and the resultant sensations are similar to those of hunger, tricking you into thinking that you need more food.